New migraine research in 2016


In 2016, your generosity funded 4 new migraine research studies on chronic migraine treatment, childhood migraine genetics, menstrual migraine, and status migrainosus.


Meet our newest grantees and learn about their innovative projects:


rami-burstein             dr-grosberg-photo

Dr. Rami Burstein (Harvard) and Dr. Brian Grosberg (Hartford Healthcare), two internationally renowned headache specialists, received our first MRF Impact Award this spring. This $250,000 grant funds their cutting-edge research on status migrainosus, a severe form of migraine that lasts longer than 3 days. They're investigating which particular status migrainosus treatment works for which sufferers. This would finally allow doctors to tailor treatments to individual patients to prevent pain and save time and money.

 
AnnaPAndreou MRF



Dr. Anna Andreou
's 2016 award makes her a two-time MRF Grantee. She received our Thomas E. Heftler Award for outstanding young researchers in 2010. Now, 6 years later, she's received another grant, this time to study BiTox, a potential next-gen Botox molecule. She'll investigate it as a new treatment for chronic migraine.
 







andrew-hershey-hires



Dr. Andrew Hershey
 is an MRF Medical Advisory Board member and now he's also an MRF Grantee. He'll use his grant to analyze data from the CHAMP study, his groundbreaking NIH Children and Adolescent Migraine Prevention project. The study has already produced shocking results that found a placebo to be just as effective at preventing migraine in kids as 2 commonly prescribed medications. Now, Dr. Hershey will be identifying which genes may be responsible for treatment response in childhood migraine.







linnman



Dr. Clas Linnman
 is the 2016 recipient of the Association of Migraine Disorders Grant and an Assistant Professor at Harvard. He'll be studying the role of estrogen fluctuations in menstrual migraine. Dr. Linnman will look at brain changes over the menstrual cycle using fMRI and PET imaging scans. Looking at hormone level changes, brain structure and function, and migraine onset could significantly add to the understanding of the causes of menstrual migraine.
 





We've now supported 71 researchers in 10 different countries, all working hard to help you or someone you know. We can't do this without you. Please help us fund innovative research by donating now. 100% of your gift will go directly to fund new migraine studies.